Events/Announcements Feed

Coralville: Mayor's Clean Up Week is May 9 to May 13, 2016

Clean out for Mayor’s Clean up Week

May 9-13

Set out big items, such as wrecked furniture or washed-up bathroom fixtures, for free pickup on trash day from May 9 to May 13.  

For unwanted (but usable) building and housing materials and appliances, consider donating them to ReStore. Free pickup is available, donations are tax-deductible, and ReStore sells the items to support Iowa Valley Habitat for Humanity.  Learn more

via www.coralvillecourier.com


Coralville's City-wide Garage Sale - April 30, 2016

Shop the City-Wide Garage Sale

Saturday, April 30 | 8:00 am to noon

Find a treasure at the annual city-wide garage sale! Starting at 8:00 am on Saturday, stop by the Coralville Recreation Center to pick up a map of participating sales and grab a first come, first served continental breakfast. Learn more

via www.coralvillecourier.com


2016 Farmers Market season opens in Iowa City on Wednesday, May 4

Grab your baskets, bags and boxes and make your way to Chauncey Swan Parking Ramp, 405 E. Washington Street, between 5 and 7 p.m. on Wednesday, May 4 to load up on fresh local foods and goods at opening day of the 2016 Iowa City Farmers Market. As in years past, Iowa City's Farmers Markets will be held on Wednesdays and Saturdays at Chauncey Swan Ramp, and on Tuesdays at Mercer Park, 2701 Bradford Drive. The schedule is as follows:

  • Mercer Park Farmers Market, 1317 Dover St.
    Operates May 31 - Aug. 30
    Tuesdays, 3-6 p.m.

  • Chauncey Swan Park Farmers Markets, 405 E. Washington St.
    Operates May - Oct.
    Wednesdays, 5-7 p.m.
    Saturdays, 7:30 a.m.-12 p.m.

This season, the Iowa City Farmers Market will be more accessible than ever with the addition of a credit card and Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) program. Shoppers may bring their Electronic Benefit Transfer (EBT) and/or credit cards to a centralized information table and swipe their cards for tokens that correspond with the amount they choose to spend from their cards. All eligible vendors will accept the SNAP tokens and all vendors will accept the credit card tokens.

“The addition of the SNAP/credit card program is really a win-win for us,” said Administrative Secretary Tammy Neumann, who manages the Farmers Market for Iowa City Parks and Recreation. “It’s good for the vendors because it will bring in new patrons, and it’s good for the shoppers because they can access fresh local foods more easily.”

The addition of the SNAP/credit card program also helps fulfill the mission of the Market, which is to serve culturally and economically diverse populations, and to increase access to fresh, locally produced, nourishing and safe foods and other products of local labor for all patrons.

The Iowa City Farmers Market is a program of the Iowa City Parks and Recreation Department.


Mayor’s Walks in Iowa City begin this Friday, April 29

Mayor ThrogmortonOn Friday, April 29, City of Iowa City Council member and Mayor Jim Throgmorton will begin a series of neighborhood walks through Iowa City. The Mayor’s Walks will take place throughout the spring and summer and will give the Mayor an opportunity to learn more about the City from the residents he serves.

"I want to know how things are going in our City's neighborhoods," said Mayor Throgmorton. "And walking our streets and hearing directly from neighbors is a great way to learn."

The first walk begins Friday afternoon when the Mayor will take the 3:45 p.m. Lakeside bus to the corner of Lakeside Drive and Nevada Avenue. From there, he will walk west along Lakeside Drive, north along Miami Drive, and then west along California Avenue toward Sycamore Street, engaging residents and providing contact information for City services, allowing residents to follow up with any questions after his visit.   

Mayor Throgmorton is currently serving his second term on the Iowa City Council.

For more information about the Mayor’s Walks series, email jim-throgmorton@iowa-city.org or call 319-621-9391.


Environmental Education Center featured in Architectural Digest

Center will be the host site of the Craft Your Environment fair and an Earth Day celebration on Saturday

The City of Iowa City’s Environmental Education Center at the East Side Recycling Center has been featured in Architectural Digest magazine as one of world’s “12 Rad Recycling Centers That Go Green in Style.” The article, which also recognizes facilities in Spain, Slovenia, Netherlands, Sweden, and China, as well as other cities across the United States, may be viewed at  http://www.architecturaldigest.com/gallery/recycling-center-design/all

Designed by Shive Hattery and completed by Knutson Construction in 2012, the Environmental Education Center is LEED-certified at the platinum level, the highest rating possible in the U.S. Green Building Council’s Leadership in Energy and Environmental (LEED) Design Program. Built as part of the East Side Recycling Center at 2401 Scott Boulevard SE, the Education Center is just one of many features of the complex. Visitors are able to drop off all kinds of recycling, ranging from paper, plastic, and glass to oil, wine corks, and electronic waste, and also visit partner facilities that likewise promote reusing and recycling: Iowa Valley Habitat for Humanity ReStore, Furniture Project, and the Friends of Historic Preservation Salvage Barn. For more information on these community resources, visit www.icgov.org/recycling, www.iowacityrestore.com, and http://salvagebarn.org/.

The Environmental Education Center is also used regularly for ECO Iowa City and other City of Iowa City meetings and activities, and also offers a unique space that may be rented for private events. More information is available at www.icgov.org/eventfacilities.

On Saturday, April 23, the Environmental Education Center will be the host site of an Earth Day celebration and craft fair. From 10 a.m. to 3 p.m., join Friends of Historic Preservation, Salvage Barn, Iowa Valley Habitat for Humanity ReStore, and the City of Iowa City for the third annual Craft Your Environment fair, which showcases the work of artists and crafters who use recycled materials in their creations, thereby keeping still-usable materials out of the landfill.

The fair will also host local environmental groups with kids’ activities and information about recycling, composting, climate activism, the Songbird Project, and more. Additional information is available at www.icgov.org/news/third-annual-craft-your-environment-fair-saturday-april-23 or www.salvagebarn.org/craft-your-environment.html.


Parks and Recreation staff launch Million Gallon Challenge

In an effort to operate smarter and more efficiently, Iowa City Parks and Recreation staff has challenged themselves to conserve one million gallons of water this summer season. This initiative, inspired by the Illinois Sustainable Technology Center’s Billion Gallon Water Challenge for the state of Illinois, aims to promote environmental sustainability while fostering responsible stewardship of Iowa City tax dollars. 

The Parks and Recreation Department staff hopes to achieve this goal by implementing various outdoor and indoor water saving practices such as reducing irrigation run times, reusing water, and repairing leaky fixtures.

“Conserving water resources as much as possible is a standard practice for our Department, but I’m proud of our Parks staff for taking the initiative to try and do even better,” Parks and Recreation Director, Juli Seydell Johnson said.

Though efforts are being made to cut back on water usage, Seydell Johnson said that the quality and usability of athletic fields and parks will remain a high priority. “The focus is on making smart changes that will save money and conserve water resources without sacrificing the quality of the user experience.”

One technique that Parks staff are experimenting with is recycling water that is used to paint athletic fields. Rather than using clean water to mix with the paint, they’re looking at using rain water or recycling the water previously used in field painting.

Efforts to conserve water will be on-going throughout the summer irrigation season, which runs through October.


Iowa City area receives Technology Community of the Year award from Technology Association of Iowa

The Iowa City Area Development Group (ICAD), on behalf of the Iowa City area (Iowa City, North Liberty and Coralville), won the inaugural Technology Community of the Year award at the Technology Association of Iowa's 11th annual LWBJ Prometheus Awards. More than 1,000 people attended the event, held Thursday, April 14 at the Iowa Events Center in Des Moines, to recognize companies, individuals and communities that support technology in Iowa.

The award was received for being a region that supports tech-based companies and uses information and communications technology to improve quality of life, education and workforce. The area was recognized for its support of entrepreneurial activity and local companies that are large users and creators of technology, and its unique tech-focused partnerships, including three CoLab Coworking spaces, the upcoming MERGE space, the new Kirkwood Regional Center, and the strong community partnerships with the University of Iowa through the Tippie College of Business, John Pappajohn Entrepreneurial Center and the Vice President for Research and Economic Development. This ongoing support has given rise to such high profile events as Entrefest, Mission Creek Tech + Innovation, the EDC’s Innovation Expo, Startup Weekends, Flyover Fashion Festival and other events to build the entrepreneurial ecosystem.

Mark Nolte, President of the Iowa City Area Development Group, accepted the inaugural award. “We are honored to be a part of the true spirit of collaboration and willingness to act to make the area a place where young tech companies succeed faster because of our collective efforts.”    

The Iowa City Area came out on top of an impressive slate of communities which included Ames, Cedar Falls, Cedar Rapids, Council Bluffs, Des Moines, Fairfield and the Mason City / Clear Lake area. 

The full list of 2016 Prometheus Award winners can be found at https://www.technologyiowa.org/index.cfm?nodeID=85958&audienceID=1




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Senior Center Choirs collaborate to perform concert of social justice songs at Englert

ConcertAs part of a series of events celebrating the Iowa City Senior Center’s 35th anniversary, The Center’s two choirs, the Family Folk Machine and the Voices of Experience, will present a combined intergenerational concert at the Englert Theatre on Saturday, May 21, at 2 p.m. The program, called “Hard Times Come Again No More: Songs of Struggle and Hope,”  is made up of songs about human rights and social justice, and will be presented by singers ages 4 to 86. The event is free and open to the public.

From classics like “If I Had a Hammer,” “Big Rock Candy Mountain,” and “Midnight Special” to newer songs from Steve Earle, the Wailin’ Jennys, and Gillian Welch, The Center’s multifaceted ensembles will sing about building a just society. The concert is presented in conjunction with Just Living, the University of Iowa’s Theme Semester on social justice, and is sponsored by the University of Iowa Community Credit Union.

Free refreshments will be provided at an open house reception at The Center at 28 S. Linn Street in Iowa City immediately following the concert at the Englert. The audience is invited to enjoy an afternoon snack and meet the performers from the Family Folk Machine and Voices of Experience.

Jean Littlejohn directs the Family Folk Machine, a non-auditioned intergenerational choir that performs with a folk band. Joyce Brokke directs the Voices of Experience, a chorus made up of Senior Center members ages 50 and up. Both groups practice at The Center year-round and perform throughout the community.

For more information, contact Community Outreach Specialist Emily Light at 319-356-5224 or emily-light@iowa-city.org.


Volunteers needed for Iowa River Trail clean-up

The final environmental stormwater volunteer clean-up of the spring is scheduled from noon to 3 p.m. this Sunday, April 24, along the Iowa River Trail. Volunteers will make their way south of McCollister Bridge to remove trash, woody brush, invasive plants, and downed tree limbs. A range of jobs will be available to accommodate different age groups and skill levels. No experience is necessary.

Volunteers are asked to meet at noon at the The Park Lodge at Terry Trueblood Recreation Area to receive assignments. People of all ages are encouraged to participate, but those under the age of 18 will need to have a parent sign a consent form on the day of the clean-up. Volunteers are instructed to wear long pants, socks, and closed-toe shoes or boots -- no flip-flops or sandals. Gloves and tools will be supplied.

The City asks volunteers who plan to participate to sign up on the “Iowa City Stormwater Volunteer Opportunities” Facebook event page so that they know how much equipment to bring for the clean-up. In case of inclement weather on Sunday, check the Facebook page to see if the event has been cancelled.

For more information, contact Carol Sweeting at carol-sweeting@iowa-city.org or 319−541−2385.


City Circle Acting Company presents 1776: The Musical

City Circle Acting Company of Coralville will present the musical 1776 from April 29-May 8 at the Coralville Center for the Performing Arts. Performances are April 29, 30 and May 6, 7 at 7:30 pm and May 1, 8 at 2:00 pm.

This rousing, funny, smart tale of the founding of our great nation is based on the events surrounding the signing of the Declaration of Independence and tells the story of John Adams and his struggle to persuade his colleagues to vote for American independence.  With beloved music and lyrics by Sherman Edwards and the book by Peter Stone, 1776 has won multiple Tony Awards, including Best Musical.

“I can't imagine a more important production to be presented in this Presidential election year than 1776,” says director Liz Tracey. “The most remarkable aspect of the Second Continental Congress and what the musical gets right is that it portrays the representatives of the thirteen colonies with all their imperfections and varied regionalisms and differences. The delegates argued their way to liberty with the messy process called Democracy. But it was their ability to put some of their differences aside and compromise that created a new nation. 1776 is not only a thought provoking story  but delightfully humorous with a beautiful musical score. The cast is amazing and audiences will be in for a wonderful evening.”

Tickets to the show are $12-$27 and can be purchased online at http://www.coralvillearts.org or by calling 319.248.9370 or in person at the CCPA box office at 1301 5th Street and at the Coralville Recreation Center at 1506 8th Street.