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Carb-Check Diet: Chicken and Turkey meats are USUALLY carb-free

Mike Thayer 2016 (2)By Mike Thayer

I used to look up carb counts on the internet or read the packaging for each and every food item I prepared and ate.    When putting something on the grill or in a frying pan for example, I would read the packaging or look on the internet for the serving size and carb count.  Writing those numbers down, I would then do some math to get a carb count total for all foods consumed at meal time.  That carb count research got tedious at times, but now I've got some great data to share!

You don't have to look up carb counts one-at-a-time, I've done all that work for you!

Find carb counts for meat, fish, dairy, veggies, fruits, right here on www.carbcheckdiet.com.

And if you don't see the carb count for a food you want to eat listed here, it's not listed for a reason - the carb count is too high, don't eat it!

Chicken & Turkey is USUALLY carb-free, but there's a caveat.  Be careful when it comes to packaged chicken and turkey sausages and burgers.  Read those labels.  Most brands are fine, but keep in mind that chicken and turkey are lean meats and so in grinding these meats, well, they naturally lack a lot of flavor.  Manufacturers of chicken/turkey sausages and the like use a lot of other ingredients/fillers (which means carbs) in making those products taste good.   

Carb Count:  Chicken & Turkey

Item Serving Size Carb Count (in grams)
Dark meat (chicken or turkey, skin or no skin) 6 oz. 0
White meat (chicken or turkey, skin or no skin) 6 oz. 0
Ground chicken Quarter pound 0
Ground turkey Quarter pound 0
Lunch Meat, chicken, oven roasted 6 slices 2
Lunch Meat, turkey, oven roasted 6 slices 1
Lunch Meat, turkey, smoked 6 slices 1
Hot Dogs, chicken 1 link 2.5
Hot Dogs, turkey 1 link 3
Sausage, chicken w/apple 1 link 5
Sausage, chicken w/spinach & feta 1 link 1
Sausage, chicken w/tomato & basil 1 link 2

 


You don't really have to worry about carbs when eating beef

Mike Thayer 2016 (2)By Mike Thayer

I used to look up carb counts on the internet or read the packaging for each and every food item I prepared and ate.    When putting something on the grill or in a frying pan for example, I would read the packaging or look on the internet for the serving size and carb count.  Writing those numbers down, I would then do some math to get a carb count total for all foods consumed at meal time.  That carb count research got tedious at times, but now I've got some great data to share!

You don't have to look up carb counts one-at-a-time, I've done all that work for you!

Find carb counts for meat, fish, dairy, veggies, fruits, right here on www.carbcheckdiet.com.

And if you don't see the carb count for a food you want to eat listed here, it's not listed for a reason - the carb count is too high, don't eat it! No real worries though when it comes to eating beef.

Carb Count:  Beef

Item Serving Size Carb Count (in grams)
Brisket 6 oz. 0
Corned Beef 6 oz. 1
Ground Beef Quarter Pound 0
Hot Dogs 1 link 4
Jerky 1 oz. 1
Lunch Meat, Bologna 3 slices 1
Lunch Meat, Pastrami 6 slices 1
Lunch Meat, Roast Beef 6 slices 0.5
Ribs 6 oz. 0
Roast 6 oz. 0
Salami 3 slices 1
Steak, any cut 6 oz. 0
Stew Meat 6 oz. 0
Summer Sausage 1 oz. 0.5

 

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Bachelor on the Cheap: Stretching your food dollar until payday

Mike Thayer 2016 (2)By Mike Thayer

Payday isn't for another couple days and you've got just a few bucks in your wallet....  What are you going to eat over the next few days?

Been there, done that.

That's why it's SO important to have a well stocked pantry, to be able to make and eat good food until that next paycheck hits the bank account.

When you've got cash in your pocket, there are those times when it's tempting and all too easy to stop at that convenient fast food joint or order a pizza.....  Don't do it.  Head to the grocery store instead.   Invest that money you are tempted to spend on junk food, on stocking up your pantry instead.   Investing in pantry items is like money in the bank, when those lean $ days hit, you have no frets about how you're going to feed yourself.

Regular readers know that I've written about the importance of having a well stocked pantry and what to put in it before.  If you're new to this site, or you wish to review that pantry list, you can read up on that here: 

Bachelor on the Cheap: Essential must haves for stocking your pantry and fridge

When you're short on bucks, it's nice to be able to just reach into the pantry and fridge/freezer and pull out some ingredients to make a pot of chili, or put together some kind of chicken dish for example.   There's no reason to worry about what you're going to eat with just three simple planning steps.

STEP 1:  Every time you are tempted to eat fast food or order a pizza, head to the grocery store instead, $7 spent on a burger and fries goes WAY farther at the grocery store....  You know this, so to borrow a line from Nike, "Just do it."  Invest your money in the ability to create multiple meals, not just one (fast food) or two (pizza).

STEP 2:    If you don't like to cook, learn.  This is a life skill, heck, a survival skill.  Know how to feed yourself, don't depend on others to do it for you.  Side benefit:  Family, friends and more importantly that special someone, likes that skill in you.  If you already know how to cook, kudos, go to Step 3.

STEP 3:  Meal plan and grocery shop based on what you have and/or don't have in your pantry.  These things go hand in hand.  Knowing what you want to eat and having it at the ready = making it happen.

Yes, it's that simple.  Buying a pizza typically costs around $20 and that's two meals, maybe three, tops.  Spending $20 at the grocery store gets you a variety of canned and/or dried goods; soups, vegetables, meats, etc., that you can have on hand to create a number of some rather tasty meals with. 

Invest in a pantry, it's 'food' money in the bank.

Related, making something from the pantry/fridge:  Cream of Chicken Soup


Carb-Check Diet: Your best bet for breakfast - scrambled eggs

Mike Thayer 2016 (2)By Mike Thayer

Eggs are full of protein, protein that will satisfy your appetite and keep you feeling full until lunch time.

The best way to cook those eggs is scrambled.  Why?  Because you can add just about anything you want to them and making scrambled eggs is easier and faster than making an omelette. 

Eggs are Carb-Check Diet friendly and your best breakfast bet to starting off the day deliciously right!



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Grilling goes hand in hand with the Carb-Check Diet

Mike Thayer 2016 (2)By Mike Thayer

Pork Chops Smoked Low and SlowWhat would you rather have, a grilled hot dog or one that's been heated up in a frying pan?  Would you rather have a breast of chicken grilled, or oven baked?  I don't know about you, but I'll choose the grilled variety every time just based on flavor, but a bonus is, most grilled versions of meats are leaner too. 

Grilling lends itself to a leaner diet, just by the method of cooking.  Think about it, fats come off the meats and drip down into the coals, making for a leaner bite vs. a meat that's fried or baked in an oven.  Both of the latter two methods of cooking typically means the meat is sitting in a hot pan of oils and/or meat fats.   Yes, grilled beats even oven baked because most recipes for the oven call for the addition of oils and/or starches (carbs) to add flavor and keep them moist and the meats bathe, er, cook in those oils and/or starches.

Here's an example:  You can throw an all beef hot dog on the grill, as is, get that great grilled flavor - 150 calories.  Throw an all beef hot dog in the frying pan with a teaspoon of olive oil and add 40 calories to that to hot dog total and now you're eating 190 calories.  Never mind that the fried version doesn't taste as good.  If you're into counting calories, that's significant, especially over the long term, 30 calories here, 40 calories there....  It adds up.   Heck, it adds up in just one meal....  If you eat two grilled hot dogs - 300 calories.  If you eat two fried hot dogs - 380 calories.

Now regular readers know that counting calories isn't really done in the Carb-Check Diet, so let me give you another example in how grilling lends itself to a leaner diet.   A six ounce grilled chicken breast with some dry rub and a kiss of olive oil is about 280 calories, no carbs and it's delicious!  A six ounce chicken breast done in the oven is about 250 calories, but then, how do you make it taste good?  Add a little olive oil and tomato sauce?   Add another 80 calories and 8 grams in carbs.  How about rolling it in bread crumbs and oven 'frying' it?  Add another 120 calories and a whopping 21 grams in carbs!

And here's an even better measure in how grilling goes hand in hand with the Carb-Check Diet.....  Eating two deliciously seasoned grilled cheeseburger patties is better in terms of diet, enjoying the food and STICKING to the diet, than eating a fried burger on a bun with a side of fries.  Eating a tantalizing grilled chicken breast is better than eating oven 'fried' chicken tenders.  Eating a mouth-watering grilled steak is better than eating baked steak smothered in a mushroom gravy and served on a bed of noodles to make it taste good.  It's those carbs that kill you, especially in foods that are breaded and fried, heck, as you can see, even oven fried!

Grilled meats are typically leaner, grilled meats have a flavor advantage created by the smoke (no calories, no carbs) and grilled meats can also save you time in future meals, grill a bunch to create some great leftovers!  

Eat leaner, eat grilled.

For more Carb-Check Diet information, tips and recipes, go to www.carbcheckdiet.com


Carb-Check Diet: Pork Rind Crusted Tilapia

Mike Thayer 2016 (2)By Mike Thayer

Pork Rind Breaded TilapiaThis was tonight's dinner. Two pork rind crusted Tilapia fillets. That's right, you read that correctly, pork rind crusted! DELICIOUS!  Finely pulsed regular, plain pork rinds in a food processor, rather than bread crumbs.  I added some seasoning to the pulsed pork rinds, some dried parsley, garlic powder, salt, black pepper.  After soaking the fish fillets in some milk for a bit, I 'breaded' the fillets and put them in some hot canola oil, 3 minutes on the first side, 2 minutes on the second.

It's another dose of YUM!  I'm full, I'm feeling very satisfied with a crunchy fried food..... no side dishes required. And guess what, no carbs! This dinner provided me with 40 grams of protein. I tested the pork rind 'breading' on fish because fish doesn't take long at all to cook, my fear was burning the 'breading' from a longer stay in the frying pan. But based on these initial results, I'm thinking some thin cut pork chops is worth a try!

For more diet information, tips and recipes, go to www.carbcheckdiet.com