A Colorado bakery is being accused of discrimination and investigated after refusing to make Bible-shaped cakes that included anti-gay wording — a somewhat  different scenario from what is typically seen when Christian bakers refuse to make cakes for same-sex weddings, but one that will certainly invoke debate over the free speech rights of business owners.

Problems began for the Azucar Bakery in Denver back in March 2014, when customer Bill Jack requested that at least one of his cakes include the words “God hates gays,” shop owner Marjorie Silva told USA Today.

Silva also said that the man wanted to include an image of two men holding hands, but after she saw the design concepts she declined to include the anti-gay wording or the image of the men, instead offering to make the Bible-shaped cakes without those elements.

“After I read it, I was like ‘No way,’” Silva told USA Today. “‘We’re not doing this. This is just very discriminatory and hateful.’”

But Jack, who is the founder of a Christian organization known as Worldview, didn’t take too kindly to that refusal, filing a complaint against Azucar Bakery with the Colorado Civil Rights Division, sparking a religious discrimination investigation into the incident. If it is determined that discrimination did, indeed, occur, the case against the bakery will move on to the Colorado Civil Rights Commission for additional scrutiny.

Silva told USA Today that the discrimination claim is unfair, though, as she believe “he was the one that [was] discriminating.”

When KUSA-TV inquired to find out why Jack had requested the cakes from the bakery and what messaging he had asked to be included on them, he declined to answer, instead issuing a short statement affirming his belief that he was “discriminated against.”