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Passengers stranded after Delta flights grounded worldwide

Tens of thousands of people were stranded Monday after Delta Air Lines flights were grounded around the globe due to a system outage.

The carrier pointed to an overnight power outage in its hometown of Atlanta, saying that has "impacted Delta computer systems and operations worldwide, resulting in flight delays."

The glitch appeared to knock Delta's automated check-in kiosks offline, forcing agents at ticket counters to manually check-in some passengers. Even with that, it was not immediately clear when flights might begin departing again for Delta.

via www.usatoday.com


TSA uproar spills into Congress | TheHill

Massive airport security lines across the country are frustrating travelers and creating pressure for Congress to do something about the problems at the Transportation Security Administration (TSA).

With summer travel season approaching, lawmakers have been scrambling to schedule hearings, meet with TSA officials and explore their legislative options.

The uproar is being further fueled by a social media campaign, “I Hate the Wait,” that has been drawing attention to overwhelmed security lines where passengers have at times waited for hours, missing their flights and getting stranded at airports overnight.

Sen. Mark Kirk (R-Ill.) has called on TSA Administrator Peter Neffenger to resign if he does not effectively mitigate travel disruptions by Memorial Day weekend.

Congress already approved a $34 million funding shift in TSA’s current budget to hire and train nearly 800 new screening officers and provide overtime for current ones.

But some travel advocates worry that the help might not come soon enough, with one of the busiest travel weekends of the year just around the corner.

A House-passed bill to expand TSA’s PreCheck program remains stalled in the Senate, and many lawmakers are reluctant to provide significant funding boosts to the unpopular agency.

“You can acknowledge a problem, commit to solving it and even pass legislation, but that doesn’t mean that help is going to be on the way by next weekend,” said Jonathan Grella, executive vice president of public affairs for the U.S. Travel Association. “The lines will likely get worse before they get better.”

via thehill.com


Study: 58,000 U.S. bridges found to be 'structurally deficient'

The five states with the most deficient bridges were Iowa with 5,025, Pennsylvania with 4,783, Oklahoma with 3,776, Missouri with 3,222 and Nebraska with 2,474.

The five states with the biggest share of deficient bridges were Rhode Island at 23.2%, Pennsylvania at 21%, Iowa at 20.7%, South Dakota at 19.7% and Oklahoma at 16.4%.

via www.press-citizen.com


US State Department issues global travel warning: What you should know - CSMonitor.com

The US State Department has issued a rare global travel alert for possible travel risks due to “increased terrorist threats.” 

While there is no specific threat in the United States, the department warned that people should be more vigilant after recent multiple attacks in France, Nigeria, Denmark, Turkey, and Mali.

In a message posted on its website, the State Department said: "Current information suggests that [Islamic State], Al Qaeda, Boko Haram, and other terrorist groups continue to plan terrorist attacks in multiple regions."

via www.csmonitor.com


State Department issues worldwide travel alert for U.S. citizens, cites terror threats - Washington Times

The State Department has released a worldwide travel alert for Americans, citing increased terrorism threats worldwide and advising U.S. citizens to “avoid large crowds or crowed places,” especially during the holiday season.

The Monday alert, which also warned Americans of the risks of using public transportation and attending theater and sporting events, is effective for three months and only expires on Feb. 24, the State Department said.

via www.washingtontimes.com


Flight to Atlanta grounded due to tarantula problem

ATLANTA, Ga. (WRDW) -- We've all heard of snakes on a plane, but how about spiders? A Delta flight from Baltimore to Atlanta was delayed Thursday morning, not by weather or mechanical issues, but an eight legged issue.

Traveling can be a real headache, and it certainly was for one flight coming into Atlanta. "Delta told us it's a mechanical issue, and they weren't sure when the plane was going to be ready but that we would all be re-booked," said one passenger, Aileen Carlucci.

Aileen Carlucci was all set to fly from Baltimore to Atlanta when she and her husband were told their plane was not going anywhere. "All of the excitement in Baltimore and Washington has been the Pope being in town. I did not expect the excitement of what happened to me on the Delta flight," she said.

The excitement, some fellow travelers, most passengers didn't even know about. "My husband and I went to go be booked at another counter, and when we did the ticketing agent said they had tarantulas on the plane and that was the reason nobody could get on to the plane," the passenger said.

A Delta representative tells us an employee saw a tarantula loose in the baggage carrier. The plane had traveled from Atlanta to Baltimore, and was returning back to Atlanta. They could not comment on how many spiders were on board the flight due to customer privacy. "The plane had some in the night before, someone had transported the tarantulas, they weren't sure how many had gotten loose, but they were loose!" Carlucci said.

via www.wrdw.com



American Airlines accidentally sends wrong plane to Hawaii - Yahoo News

Washington (AFP) - American Airlines accidently sent the wrong plane across the ocean from Los Angeles to Hawaii, a company spokesman confirmed to AFP Sunday.

In the August 31 incident, first reported by transportation blogger Brian Sumers, a plane that was not authorized to fly long distances over open water made the flight -- albeit safely -- to Honolulu.

American Airlines spokesman Casey Norton said they were still looking into how the mix-up happened.

via news.yahoo.com


10 Things to Do Before International Travel | TIME

Make a budget

Check your passport and visa requirements. You will need at least 6 months before expiry in your passport to travel out of the country. Check to see if you need a visa(s) for the country(s) you’re visiting. Some can take weeks to process, so plan ahead. Make sure you’ve got enough pages in your passport: consider the number of stamps you’ll be getting. Then find a nice, safe spot to keep your passport on your travels and make that the only place you keep it.

via time.com


Black box shows co-pilot Lubitz sped up plane's descent - CNN.com

Marseille, France (CNN)Initial tests on the flight data recorder recovered from downed Germanwings Flight 9525 show that co-pilot Andreas Lubitz purposely used the controls to speed up the plane's descent, according to the French air accident investigation agency, the BEA.

The flight data recorder, or "black box," was found Thursday by recovery teams that have spent days since the March 24 crash scouring the mountainside in the French Alps where the plane went down.

via www.cnn.com